Tag Archives: lectures

Six small practical changes in your teaching that can have big impact

Are you scared off by the breadth and depth of changes to your teaching that are often suggested by well-meaning colleagues? There are many things that you can do to improve student experience and learning, but they don’t all need to take hours to design and implement. Here are six practical and eminently achievable suggestions for small changes that can have big impact.

Continue reading Six small practical changes in your teaching that can have big impact

A Nobel laureate walks into a classroom…

Nobel physics laureate Carl Wieman knows a thing or two about science. Thankfully for us in higher education, he is also passionate about good learning and teaching. This makes his recent comments that current teaching methods are archaic and “medieval in the sense that it’s somebody up there dispensing information” even more cause for concern. Here are his five main points from a recent talk, and some practical ways we can apply it in our teaching.

Continue reading A Nobel laureate walks into a classroom…

Learn how to engage students with Lecture Tools

You’ve read the Teche article about student engagement in face to face, were enthused after hearing the positive experiences of other academics at the Learning and Teaching Exchange and now want to know how to use Lecture Tools?

Then come along to the Lecture Tools workshop!

Continue reading Learn how to engage students with Lecture Tools

How to make your lectures more active for students

This topic seems particularly pertinent as the traditional lecture is being challenged by alternative modes for educational delivery. For example the University of Adelaide is phasing out lectures for  a flipped mode delivery. Some argue that lectures can still be a valid form of instruction we just need to make them more engaging and collaborative.

Continue reading How to make your lectures more active for students

Avoiding Death by PowerPoint – using PowerPoint

The past few months have seen a resurgence of calls to ban PowerPoint in lectures. Apparently, PowerPoint is toxic for education, and  makes students stupider and professors more boring. Being a fan of PowerPoint, and less so of the traditional lecture, you can imagine my delight to read Jared Horvath and Jason Lodge’s recent sensible article that it’s not PowerPoint’s fault – you’re just using it wrong.  Since lectures and, let’s face it, PowerPoint, aren’t going anywhere anytime soon, how can we avoid death by PowerPoint and make them work together?

Continue reading Avoiding Death by PowerPoint – using PowerPoint