Tag Archives: Innovative teaching

A ‘savvy’ way to expose undergraduates to research

Encouraging undergraduate students to do some research is good. It improves ‘authenticity’ of learning, helps students put what they learn into practice and improves students’ confidence.

However, what do you do if you are teaching neuroscience and the required research equipment costs tens of thousands of dollars?! You get an affordable, commercial ‘gaming’ headpiece that costs ~60 times less. Continue reading A ‘savvy’ way to expose undergraduates to research

How can evidence-based practice be embedded into a program?? Our story

What do we really want our graduates to be? What skills do we want them to acquire to become excellent practitioners? One answer to this question is that our graduates need to become ‘evidence-based’ practitioners and use the latest evidence in professional decision-making.

Dr. Andrew Davidson and Mary Simons share a great story of how they have been helping medical students to become ‘evidence-based’ clinicians.

Continue reading How can evidence-based practice be embedded into a program?? Our story

The dangers of a potluck dinner, and other metaphors for understanding program-based design

With program-based design squarely on Macquarie University’s agenda, it’s more important than ever to have a shared understanding of what program-based design is. How is it different from the more common approach of focusing on individual units?

Continue reading The dangers of a potluck dinner, and other metaphors for understanding program-based design

University assignments: why students rarely go ‘outside of the box’

Macquarie undergraduate student Aprill Miles took to the podium to deliver a keynote at the German Undergraduate Research Conference last month. For Aprill, the experience of working on her own research project has been truly transformational. It also opened her eyes on why many students rarely go ‘outside of the box’ in their university assignments.  Continue reading University assignments: why students rarely go ‘outside of the box’

5 differences between traditional and active learning [infographic]

Have you heard the calls for educators to stop being the ‘sage on the stage’ and become ‘facilitators’ instead? Or the famous quote by Einstein that ‘knowledge is experience – everything else is just information’? There are very good reasons why it’s time to embrace active learning, and our handy Infographic might help!

Continue reading 5 differences between traditional and active learning [infographic]

Enquiry-Based Learning and Student Research

My previous Teche post discusses how student engagement with research can be facilitated by building enquiry-based learning activities into the curriculum, as these enable students to develop an orientation and many of the skills needed for research tasks.  These include analysing requirements, investigating source materials, identifying critical information and ideas, constructing a resolution and working in teams.

Continue reading Enquiry-Based Learning and Student Research