Tag Archives: Human Sciences

Innovation and PACE shine in Learning and Teaching Week 2013 eBook

Macquarie’s annual celebration of pedagogy and scholarship, Learning and Teaching Week was held from 16-20 September 2013. As presenters are encouraged each year to publish their work as a way of sharing practice and furthering research in this area, an eBook option was offered as a new publishing platform to those who presented papers, symposia, roundtables and workshops. Continue reading Innovation and PACE shine in Learning and Teaching Week 2013 eBook

Introducing Michael Rampe

While Ming Ming Diao is seconded to the DEEWR project, Michael Rampe will be the Human Sciences Educational Designer. Michael is assigned from LTC to support the Faculty this year and is fluent with the University’s enterprise learning systems including iLearn, Units and iTeach.

rampe_smMichael’s professional specialty is educational media and he is also currently undertaking his PhD studies here in the Faculty, investigating the multimodal characteristics of educational video. Michael has extensive video production experience and is keen to help produce videos for online teaching, flipped classroom or other purposes. FoHS have a mobile video rig and FBE have a full production suite.

Here are some examples of Michael’s impressive work:

Flipped Classroom


Gamification


PACE & Wesley Mission Partnership

Michelle Parrish for Wesley Mission had this to say about the success of the PACE:

Time spent talking to you and your team at MQ is always time well spent. I now have two wonderful highly intelligent graduates from MQ working as case managers in my team, so I couldn’t be happier 🙂

On Monday this week, I offered Chris Foo ( recent graduate MU) a casual P.T  case manger position in my team. Chris was one of the 7 students that I had on placement with me last year too. So that’s three of your wonderful graduates in my team now 🙂

Free Event: Transforming Higher Education with Augmented Reality

Augmented RealityCome along and listen to Dr Matt Bower and Mr David Grover, both from the School of Education, talk about the fascinating topic of Augmented Reality in Higher Education.

By enabling users to overlay multimedia information on the world around us, Augmented Reality has immense potential to transform tertiary education. This presentation outlines what Augmented Reality is, how it works, applications available to educators, and how it might be infused into the curriculum. The presentation will also provide an overview of the Augmented Reality knowledge base that has been developed as part of this project, which includes examples, resources and guides.

2pm – 3pm, Thursday 27 February, 2014
To join this informative and captivating session, please click here to register

How is your PhD student doing?

Photo by Mike Catabay, LTC, Macquarie University

The LTC and the Department of Education are conducting research on the role of social support in doctoral education.

PhD candidates at any stage of their study are invited  to participate in focus groups and/or one-on-one interviews. A monetary incentive is provided to each participant for each session.

The findings will propose guidelines for support services and practices in doctoral education, in order to enhance the HDR experience.

Tell your PhD student about this study!

Click for more details and to sign up  or email Lilia Mantai lilia.mantai@mq.edu.au

 

Positively Re-designed: PSY 963’s Faculty Partnership Program Project

Dr Monique Crane, Lecturer in Organisational Psychology was the academic lead on a Faculty Partnership Project in Session 1 this year that aimed to redesign PSY 963 Coaching and Positive Psychology in a way that was both engaging and academically challenging for students. The LTC project team worked with Monique to rejuvenate the curriculum for blended delivery, introducing a number of tools and techniques that included collaborative authorship tasks and video scenarios.

PreziPrezi for Collaborative Authorship
With collaborative authorship teaching tasks, PSY 963 students literally contribute to the workshop material, creating a mixture of expert content and student-generated content for the unit.

Collaborative authorship is a strategy that makes use of participatory technologies in the classroom as a way of developing student-centred learning opportunities and increasing student engagement. Monique reported that such participatory technologies allow “students to collaboratively develop an outcome related to the workshop content through the use of an online medium such as Prezi or a Wiki. This process can be moderated and guided by the chair in real time. At the end of this process, all students have access to their collaboratively authored resources that will assist in guiding their future practice.”

Monique is now a collaborator on a project funded by a grant from the Innovation and Scholarship Program (with the LTC’s Oliver Coady) to extend the work from the Faculty Partnership project in examining the role of collaborative authorship in the classroom to improve student engagement and skill transfer.

PSY963 VideoAuthentic Video Scenarios
Macquarie’s Human Resources Department collaborated with Monique and the LTC project team in the production of video scenarios for PSY 963 which demonstrate a coach implementing a strategy with clients in different situations. Rather than actors, the videos star professional coaching experts based here at Macquarie who also helped script the videos. These videos are not only core resources for the unit itself but can also be used in other professional development settings, as well as a teaching resource in the classroom or online.

Monique says she values the insights gained from her experience working with the LTC project team and is now implementing the new teaching strategies she has learned across all her units. “The LTC has expertise in the area of adult learning and this means that they are able to provide insight into new teaching methods and content delivery. Students are exposed to innovative teaching techniques too.”

Changing Perceptions of Online Delivery – the EDUC 258 Faculty Partnership Project

Dr Michael Cavanagh and A/Prof Joanne Mulligan from the School of Education have been working with a team from the LTC on redesigning EDUC258 Mathematics in Schools for Session 3, an experience which Michael says has ‘changed my perception of the potential benefits of online delivery for students’.

A Session 3 timeframe means the weekly topics are compressed from 13 weeks down to 5 online modules in iLearn, complemented by a reduced number of face-to-face sessions. The unit will introduce students to some fundamental ideas about the learning and teaching of mathematics in schools. According to Michael, ‘the biggest challenge has been to identify the key concepts and skills for students to learn about in the unit. My colleagues and I decided that it was more important for students to think deeply about what they were learning and have sustained opportunities to reflect on their growing understanding of the unit content, so we wanted to allow time for that to occur. That meant cutting back on some content, but I think the end result will lead to significant student learning.’

In order to accommodate the compressed timeframe, the unit also employs quite a bit of video, including short ‘talking head’ videos where teaching staff describe some of the key concepts, as well as panel discussions. With maintaining student engagement a high priority in the online space, the unit also includes a video of a past student giving tips on how to engage online. The LTC team have also helped to create a ‘teacher voice’ in the online space that guides the students on how they should work through the online materials. Photos of the teaching staff are displayed within the activities in iLearn.

Online Poll Image

The idea of a learning community underpins the unit, with students expected to take an active role in their own learning and share a greater responsibility for their progress. Michael says that in the new online design, ‘there are many more opportunities for students to engage with the ideas, share their thinking to enrich their own learning and that of their peers, and to reflect on how their new knowledge is supporting their development as teachers. It’s my hope that by participating in the online activities and thinking about the ideas students will find the subsequent on-campus sessions more beneficial.’
EDUC258 will be run this year in Session 3, and an in-depth evaluation will be undertaken via TEDS surveys and focus groups. Looking further ahead, Michael says, ‘I hope that we can incorporate the underlying design principles that have guided the redevelopment of the unit and many of the learning and teaching activities into the Session 1 offering of the unit.’

‘For me, the project has been a great opportunity to work with LTC staff who are experts in learning design. Their ideas and practical support have really helped me to reflect on how to maximise learning opportunities for students in an online environment.’