iLearn Drop-in Clinic back in 2014!

 

Images courtesty of Tony Dwyer, LTC
Teaching staff enjoying 1:1 support at the Drop in Clinic.

Breathe a sigh of relief, the iLearn Drop-in Clinic is back for Session 1, 2014!

Come and get all the help you need with iLearn, iTeach and UNITS for Session 1, 2014.  No need to register, just swing by.

Mark these dates in your calendar:
Monday 17 Feb – Friday 28 Feb, 10am-4pm weekdays, C5A 204
Monday 3 Mar – Friday 7 Mar, 10am-4pm weekdays, E4B 308

 

Panos reflects on MOOCs

panos vlachopoulosIn October 2013 I engaged in a discussion with fellow online learning scholars in the Association of Learning Technology Mail-list (UK). We discussed various issues related to MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) and their perceived and actual value for enhancing learning in Universities. Perhaps the most well thought out contribution was made by Professor Diana Laurillard  from the Institute of Education, University of London. She wrote: Continue reading Panos reflects on MOOCs

Macquarie University Staff Successful at EdTech Conference

Macquarie University recently hosted the 30th Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning (ascilite).

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ascilite 2013 conference attendees in Macquarie Theatre

Matt Bower a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Education and colleagues were awarded best full paper for Bower, M., Kenney, J., Dalgarno, B., Lee, M.J.W. & Kennedy, G.E. (2013). Blended synchronous learning: Patterns and principles for simultaneously engaging co-located and distributed learners. In H. Carter, M. Gosper and J. Hedberg (Eds.), Electric Dreams. Proceedings ascilite 2013 Sydney. (pp.92-102)

Panos Vlachopoulos a Senior Lecturer in the Learning and Teaching Centre and colleagues were awarded best short paper in the category ‘imagining the future’ for Smyth, K., Vlachopoulos, P., Walker, D., Wheeler, A. (2013). Cross-Institutional development of an online open course for educators: confronting current challenges and imagining future possibilities. In H. Carter, M. Gosper and J. Hedberg (Eds.), Electric Dreams. Proceedings ascilite 2013 Sydney. (pp.826-829)

A new feature at this conference was the introduction of digital poster sessions, which made full use of the active learning space in the newly refurbished Macquarie Theatre. Elaine Huber, Alex Thackray and Rebecca Ritchie from the Learning and Teaching Centre were given the award for the best poster “Practices and perceptions of online assignment submission, marking and feedback: what’s changed?”.

To access these papers and more, go to:
http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/sydney13/program/handbookproceedings.php

Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia Conference 2014

HERSDAThe Higher Education Research and Development Society of  Australasia (HERSDA) in collaboration with the Hong Kong Baptist University are hosting the HERSDA 2014 Annual Conference from 7 to 10 of July 2014 in Hong Kong.  The conference theme is ‘Higher Education in a Globalized World’ and the call for contributions is now open.The call for proposals closes on 7 February 2014. More information about the conference can be found on the HERSDA 2014 website.

How do I know whether my TEDS results are “good” or not?

It’s difficult to determine a clear “standard” for TEDS results, since we know that they are affected by a range of contextual variables that relate to the learning and teaching environment.

Over the years, analysis of TEDS data has demonstrated persistent and consistent differences according to:
• discipline area (Faculty – this is more a reflection of student cohort differences than variation in teaching or curriculum quality);
• class level (100, 200, 300-500, 800-900-level, with 600- 700 level yet to be examined); and
• class size (this tends to have more impact on teaching than unit evaluation results, but is evident in both).

Interpreting Your TEDS Results – in Context

Without a measure of the variation attributable to each of these factors, it’s hard for an individual teacher or unit
convenor to “place” their own TEDS results in the context of their own teaching environment. However, help is at hand!

Now that we have been running the revised TEDS surveys for several semesters, we have sufficient data to provide descriptive statistics for groups of evaluations within the same context, at least to Faculty by Unit Level refinement in
most Faculties. These statistics, based on the distribution of mean (average) scores rather than individual scores in Faculty/Unit Level category, will enable you to see where your results are placed in relation to others who teach in the same context.

Where to Access

Guidance for interpreting your results in relation to the data summaries, and the summary tables themselves, are available NOW for LEU surveys only at http://staff.mq.edu.au/teaching/evaluation/surveys/compare_leu/.

The TEDS team are working on the LET tables and will inform all staff when these are ready to be accessed.

Meet the Team: David Morgan

What do you do at the LTC?
I am a Systems Administrator and my main focus is supporting the Echo360 platform. A lot of time is spent looking after server and data storage infrastructure and also the 100 odd Echo360 capture devices that create classroom recordings.

What is the most interesting part of your job?
I’ve found interest in the ways that technologies, which may have originated say as a business tool or for entertainment, can be adapted to support education. I enjoy technical challenges and being able to work creatively to find solutions. I’ve always been interested in gadgets with lots of flaDavid Morganhing lights, and our learning systems infrastructure has lots of those. I’m situated within a very supportive and adept team which makes the job seem less like work, and more like shared goals.

What did you do before you joined us?
Having studied to be an audio engineer, I worked at a music studio for several years. A lot of what I did at the studio, such as working with analogue audio systems, troubleshooting faults and pacifying drunken rock stars was surprisingly relevant when I started work at Macquarie in 2003.

How did you come to be working with us?
Through a contact I knew working at Macquarie. My first position at the University was a technical support role within the AV department. Back then, I don’t recall there being a formal interview, but there were a lot of questions asked about the potential value and technical aspects of using the internet to deliver lecture recordings.
By far my greatest challenge in that role was correctly inserting 35mm slides into the slide carousel. Each slide had a 75% chance of being back-to-front, upside-down… or both.

What do you do when you’re not working at the LTC?
I can still be found hanging around music studios and playing in bands.

What’s the most adventurous or dangerous thing you have ever done?
Some years ago a friend and I decided to start a rally racing team. Armed with a 1970’s Mini Clubman, we honed our rally driving skills by weaving amongst the trees in a paddock at my mate’s family property at Kenthurst. Despite what you might think, the actual danger came in the form of several engine modifications, which apparently made the car go faster, but also caused the engine to catch fire.

Flipped Classroom – New resource

The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which the typical lecture and problem-solving elements of a course are reversed.

The shift is from a teacher-centered classroom to a student-centered learning environment. To hear how your colleagues have been implementing this delivery model into their teaching, please visit this new resource on the LTC website.

A corresponding workshop will be run in October. Click here to register.

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Meet the Team: Robert Parker

RobertWhat do you do at the LTC?
I am an Educational Developer in the Educational Development and Design
section. I am assigned to the Faculty of Science and its Learning and TeachingCommittee. I collaborate with academic staff to think about their teaching and knowledge work, this includes: class performance, instructional design, curriculum development, applying learning technologies and constructing learner environments. This year I have worked with Greg Downey (Anthropology) and Lesley Hughes (Climate Change) to develop MOOCS in collaboration withOUA. More recently I’ve been working with Sherman Young in the Faculty of Arts and Department of Ancient History to develop a new undergraduate program, the Bachelor of Archaeology.

What is the most interesting part of your job?
I enjoy working with academic staff and learning about their research interests, teaching practice and what motivates them. The challenge is to build good professional relationships, create confidence and transform this into practical and personalised solutions for academics. I have been fortunate to receive grant funding to design and develop educational software for game-based learning.

What did you do before you joined us?
I worked at UNSW in a variety of positions that included lecturing and tutoring, elearning designer, digital media producer, software developer and systems analyst. I took time out, to work pro bono with not-for-profit organisations, Amnesty International, National Parks Association and the Richmond Fellowship. I’ve also worked as an ICT consultant to government, industry and not-for-profits
as a business analyst, software consultant and developer, researcher and tender writer. I trained as a cabinetmaker while I was at high school and university, managed a joinery and built several houses.

How did you come to be working with us?
I wanted a change from working in a school within a faculty, to a university-wide unit, when an opportunity opened at Macquarie to work in the LTC.

What do you do when you’re not working at the LTC?
Listen to live music, attend art and performance events. Hang out with family, friends and strong black coffee. Go bush walking and camping. Slide down a glassy wave or float over a rocky reef.

What’s the most adventurous or dangerous thing you have ever done?
I walked through desert country in South Australia across Lake Torrens along Moralana Creek up to Wilpena Pound, in late spring. The days were so hot, I had to dig a deep pit into the dry creek bed and lie in it, but the nights were crisp and full of life.

What would you like to do next?
I would like to collaboratively design and build a sustainable collective housing project with a couple of dozen people in their third age who want to be cooccupants. It might just make inner city life sustainable and enjoyable.

Computers in Education: Not Just a Fad!

Macquarie hosts the 30th Ascilite Conference this year.

asciliteThis year the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education (ascilite) embarks on its fourth decade of exploring the pedagogical potential of new technologies in the classroom (wherever or whatever that may be), and not in any way being smug about having ‘called it’.Here at Macquarie a group of academic and professional staff from across the university have come together to organise the 30th Annual ascilite Conference, hosted by Macquarie this December 1-4.

Continue reading Computers in Education: Not Just a Fad!

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