Category Archives: Watercooler

A series on digital media, copyright and creative commons – Part 1: Media.

Where is digital media?

This is an introduction to a series of blog posts focusing on contemporary issues relating to media, copyright law and creative commons. Comments are encouraged by all. 

Photo adapted from mkhmarketing: http://bit.ly/1gjceKu
Photo adapted from mkhmarketing: http://bit.ly/1gjceKu

There is no doubt today’s society and culture is media rich. Videos, music, and interactive multimedia are now available as forms of digital media across the Internet. Continue reading A series on digital media, copyright and creative commons – Part 1: Media.

Teche: You’re Probably Saying it Wrong

Geoffrey Chaucer, 17th C, Public Domain http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Geoffrey_Chaucer_%2817th_century%29.jpgIf you’ve ever wondered about the correct pronouncation of Teche, or even if you just love listening to a bit of Middle English, here’s a real treat:

Professor Jess B. Bessinger, Jr. reads the General Prologue from Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales.

About 17 minutes in is the sentence ending with ‘And Gladly Teche’ (from whence cometh our University Motto and blog name).

So forget about ‘tekky’ or ‘tetchy’, it seems Teche should be pronounced ‘tay-ch’.

 

What’s on the Horizon? Macquarie connection

NMC and ELI Release the NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Higher Education Edition

horizon at RhodesThe New Media Consortium (NMC) and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI)  jointly released the 11th edition of the NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Higher Education today. The NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in education.

Continue reading What’s on the Horizon? Macquarie connection

New Year New Staff!

The LTC is extending its family.

As the LTC wishes best of luck to star performers Sherrie Love, Rebecca Ritchie and Mingming Diao, who are going on secondment, it also welcomes with open arms Jorge Reyna, Victoria Taylor and Jean-Christophe Froissard as new staff who will fill the void left behind. They bring with them a wealth of experience into the LTC ranging from TAFE e-learning to expertise in BlackBoard Collaborate (something we are all keen to explore, no doubt). Jorge will be located within the Faculty of Science as the designated Educational Designer, whereas Victoria and Jean-Christophe will be located in the LTC, working with Faculties on Faculty Partnership Programs (FPP) and other initiatives such as FLaME.

A little bit about our new and extending family:

Victoria Taylor comes to us from Navitas English and has considerable design and development experience working with virtual online classrooms. Victoria replaces Rebecca Ritchie (while she is on secondment) as a centrally based educational designer and will start on Tuesday 28th Jan.

Jorge Reyna comes to us from UWS where he has been working as a blended learning advisor, supporting academics in their integration of technologies to design engaging learning activities. Jorge replaces Sherrie Love (while she is on secondment) as the educational designer attached to the Faculty of Science and will start on Feb 3rd.

Jean-Christophe Froissard (Chris) comes to us from TAFE eLearning Hub and has considerable experience in Moodle, digital media and design and development of online resources. Chris will replace MingMing Diao (whilst he is on secondment) as a centrally based educational designer and will start on Monday 17th Feb.

Please make these new lambs welcome to the farm as they embark on a journey here at Macquarie.

Three Little Lambs
(CC BY-NC 2.0) Eva Ganesha

Meet the Team: David Morgan

What do you do at the LTC?
I am a Systems Administrator and my main focus is supporting the Echo360 platform. A lot of time is spent looking after server and data storage infrastructure and also the 100 odd Echo360 capture devices that create classroom recordings.

What is the most interesting part of your job?
I’ve found interest in the ways that technologies, which may have originated say as a business tool or for entertainment, can be adapted to support education. I enjoy technical challenges and being able to work creatively to find solutions. I’ve always been interested in gadgets with lots of flaDavid Morganhing lights, and our learning systems infrastructure has lots of those. I’m situated within a very supportive and adept team which makes the job seem less like work, and more like shared goals.

What did you do before you joined us?
Having studied to be an audio engineer, I worked at a music studio for several years. A lot of what I did at the studio, such as working with analogue audio systems, troubleshooting faults and pacifying drunken rock stars was surprisingly relevant when I started work at Macquarie in 2003.

How did you come to be working with us?
Through a contact I knew working at Macquarie. My first position at the University was a technical support role within the AV department. Back then, I don’t recall there being a formal interview, but there were a lot of questions asked about the potential value and technical aspects of using the internet to deliver lecture recordings.
By far my greatest challenge in that role was correctly inserting 35mm slides into the slide carousel. Each slide had a 75% chance of being back-to-front, upside-down… or both.

What do you do when you’re not working at the LTC?
I can still be found hanging around music studios and playing in bands.

What’s the most adventurous or dangerous thing you have ever done?
Some years ago a friend and I decided to start a rally racing team. Armed with a 1970’s Mini Clubman, we honed our rally driving skills by weaving amongst the trees in a paddock at my mate’s family property at Kenthurst. Despite what you might think, the actual danger came in the form of several engine modifications, which apparently made the car go faster, but also caused the engine to catch fire.

Meet the Team: Robert Parker

RobertWhat do you do at the LTC?
I am an Educational Developer in the Educational Development and Design
section. I am assigned to the Faculty of Science and its Learning and TeachingCommittee. I collaborate with academic staff to think about their teaching and knowledge work, this includes: class performance, instructional design, curriculum development, applying learning technologies and constructing learner environments. This year I have worked with Greg Downey (Anthropology) and Lesley Hughes (Climate Change) to develop MOOCS in collaboration withOUA. More recently I’ve been working with Sherman Young in the Faculty of Arts and Department of Ancient History to develop a new undergraduate program, the Bachelor of Archaeology.

What is the most interesting part of your job?
I enjoy working with academic staff and learning about their research interests, teaching practice and what motivates them. The challenge is to build good professional relationships, create confidence and transform this into practical and personalised solutions for academics. I have been fortunate to receive grant funding to design and develop educational software for game-based learning.

What did you do before you joined us?
I worked at UNSW in a variety of positions that included lecturing and tutoring, elearning designer, digital media producer, software developer and systems analyst. I took time out, to work pro bono with not-for-profit organisations, Amnesty International, National Parks Association and the Richmond Fellowship. I’ve also worked as an ICT consultant to government, industry and not-for-profits
as a business analyst, software consultant and developer, researcher and tender writer. I trained as a cabinetmaker while I was at high school and university, managed a joinery and built several houses.

How did you come to be working with us?
I wanted a change from working in a school within a faculty, to a university-wide unit, when an opportunity opened at Macquarie to work in the LTC.

What do you do when you’re not working at the LTC?
Listen to live music, attend art and performance events. Hang out with family, friends and strong black coffee. Go bush walking and camping. Slide down a glassy wave or float over a rocky reef.

What’s the most adventurous or dangerous thing you have ever done?
I walked through desert country in South Australia across Lake Torrens along Moralana Creek up to Wilpena Pound, in late spring. The days were so hot, I had to dig a deep pit into the dry creek bed and lie in it, but the nights were crisp and full of life.

What would you like to do next?
I would like to collaboratively design and build a sustainable collective housing project with a couple of dozen people in their third age who want to be cooccupants. It might just make inner city life sustainable and enjoyable.