Category Archives: Learning Innovation

Sustainable Upgrade Improves Learning & Teaching in Surgical Skills Lab

Teche INSIGHTS

Iain Brew, Clinical AV & IT Coordinator in the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, has recently led a major upgrade in the Surgical Skills Lab. While a project of this nature may sound like it comes with a hefty price tag, as many technical upgrades do, Brew’s background in Macquarie’s Sustainability Unit empowered his adaptable approach to the project.

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Winners of the Faculty of Arts Learning and Teaching Awards 2017

The Arts Faculty is all about quality learning and teaching. So it’s no surprise that submissions to the Faculty of Arts Learning and Teaching Awards 2017 were inspirational. Here are the winners of the 2017 awards, together with short videos explaining a bit about their work.

Employability skills

Dr Iqbal Barket and Dr Karen Pearlman were recognized for facilitating student engagement, collaboration, communication and employability in screen production through the development of consolidated curricula and delivery which includes intensive teaching.

Flipped classroom

Dr Matt Bailey and Professor Sean Brawley were recognized For developing innovative flipped classroom curricula for diverse student cohorts enrolled across multiple, integrated, modes of delivery.

Communication skills

Lise Barry was recognized For inspiring law students to develop their communication skills through innovation, authentic assessment and co-curricular support.

Learning analytics

Chris Froissard, Professor Deborah Richards, Dr Danny Liu and Amara Atif were recognized For service innovation in the design, development and implementation of a learning analytics tool that supports learning and teaching at Macquarie University.

For more information about these submissions go to the Arts Community of Practice to look at the winning submissions

Ten Easy Ways To Put Research And Inquiry Into Units (9/10)

[Almost there! ] This series of posts presents ten simple suggestions to help you change your units or parts of your units to develop students’ research skills and competencies that you can adapt to suit your particular context.

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Ten Easy Ways To Put Research And Inquiry Into Units (7/10)

This series of posts presents ten simple suggestions to help you change your units or parts of your units to develop students’ research skills and competencies that you can adapt to suit your particular context.

10 easy ways

  1. Change an assessment to an inquiry
  2. Change a laboratory class to guided discovery
  3. Engage students in gathering or working with data
  4. Turn your unit of study into a conference
  5. Arrange for students to interview researchers
  6. Invite students and staff to research speed-dating
  7. Get students to write an abstract
  8. Change essays into academic articles
  9. Turn the class into a hypothesis-generating forum
  10. Create a competition

7.   Get students to write an abstract

Students frequently write essays or reports and they are often involved in reading academic papers. But they often don’t make the connections. To teach students to write coherent, cogent essays and articles, one way to start is to encourage them to write good abstracts. Abstract writing is an important skill for academics to learn but the ability to precis an argument is essential in whatever profession students undertake.

You could preface the activity with a class session where students brainstorm what they think are the qualities of a good abstract.

Examples

“Students are given a paper which the tutor has written, but from which all references to it (journal name, volume, page numbers, author name) have been deleted. The students then write an abstract for the paper. The exercise is used in tutorials to develop the skills of writing, critical analysis, summarising information and research design and planning” (Plymouth University, UK)

“In a development of this approach the teacher collects the abstracts and puts them in a common format and chooses the best four or five which are then put with the original abstract. Students vote for ‘best abstract’. Then the teacher reveals which is the author’s abstract often to the surprise of the students!” (Brigham Young University, USA).